Archive for the ‘PEOPLE’ Category

DENTISTS WARN AGAINST USING CHEAP MOUTHGUARDS AFTER THIS GIRL WAS SEVERELY INJURED IN HOCKEY GAME

Christina Johnson suffered traumatic facial injuries when she was hit by a hockey stick during a game.image www.perfectwhiteteeth.net

Christina Johnson suffered traumatic facial injuries when she was hit by a hockey stick during a game. 

Playing sport with a cheap mouthguard purchased at a pharmacy or sports store?

Christina Johnson’s horrific injuries may prompt you to get a stronger one made by a dentist.

Last week Ms Johnson suffered severe trauma to her mouth when she was hit by a hockey stick during a game in Tasmania. She was wearing a mouthguard that offered little protection.

As a result, one of her front teeth was knocked out, another one was fractured and others were pushed back and displaced. Her lips and gums were also split by the force of the hockey stick.

Ms Johnson, now facing extensive reconstructive surgery, is one of many Australians that dentists say are sustaining potentially preventable injuries during sport because they don’t have a custom-made mouthguard.

Although the Australian Dental Association says a bespoke mouthguard will cost about $250 (compared to about $10 for an over-the-counter mouthguard), it may save you serious pain and thousands of dollars for surgery if you get injured.

Dr Peter Alldritt​, chairman of the association’s Oral Health Committee, said people should give as much thought to their mouthguard as other sporting equipment because “$250 doesn’t go far when it comes to having a tooth fixed”.

“Not all of them (mouthguards) offer equal protection, and some of them can actually cause even more damage,” he said.

“Over-the-counter mouthguards are often difficult to wear and don’t provide the same level of protection as custom-fitted mouthguards; in contrast, custom-fitted mouthguards allow ease of breathing and speaking, and are far more comfortable.”

An association survey of about 1200 people recently found that three in four active adults who wear a mouthguard were using over-the-counter ones. Among children, it was one in two.

Ms Johnson said she had never considered getting a custom-fitted mouthguard from a dentist before she was injured last week.

“I thought the mouthguard I was wearing during the game, which I had bought from a store, was good enough”.

There is limited research assessing the protective effects of various mouthguards on athletes but a study of 301 Australian Rules footballers in 2001 concluded that those wearing custom-fitted mouthguards had a significantly lower rate of head and facial injuries than other players.

Sports Medicine Australia also recommends custom-fitted mouthguards for all contact sports to reduce the risk and severity of dental injuries because they can accommodate people’s unique arrangement and number of teeth and provide protection of vulnerable areas, such as the bony gum area finishing close to the junction of the inside of the cheek.

The group says a mouthguard is protective only if an adequate thickness of mouthguard material (4 millimetres – thickness of two matches) covers vulnerable areas including the biting surfaces of the upper teeth and the visible surfaces of the six front upper teeth upon which the lips rest.

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Henry Sapiecha

The bite evolution: Your teeth will tell where you came from

Research led by Monash University evolutionary biologist Alistair Evans has shown teeth track evolution-image www.perfectwhiteteeth.net

Research led by Monash University evolutionary biologist Alistair Evans has shown teeth track evolution. Photo: Simon Schluter

Science reveals the secrets of super-sized mammals

Modern diet helping bacteria to wreck our teeth

They’re good for biting, chewing and filling out a cheesy smile for the camera. But teeth have also been shown to be a surprisingly nifty way to track human evolution.

New research has shown that the evolution of teeth, long thought to be a random process, follows a pattern.

A team of international researchers led by Monash University evolutionary biologist Alistair Evans established the pattern applies to up to 90 per cent of human, mammal and hominins.
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The main rule is that the biggest teeth for australopiths (the first branch of the hominin tree from which humans evolved) are their back molars, or wisdom teeth. Meanwhile the biggest teeth in humans is the front molar.

“It was always hard to see the forest for the trees because every fossil had to be looked at independently. But here we can see a general pattern and we can be sure that it’s definitely the case,” Dr Evans said.

The newly-defined developmental pattern, outlined in the journal Nature on Thursday, is known as “the inhibitory cascade”.

It sheds lights on how humans and other mammals develop teeth, a process which begins in the embryo.

Understanding how teeth form has uses in fields from academia to cosmetic and medical treatments.

“If we want to do any bioengineering, say grow-your-own teeth, we need to understand these processes,” Dr Evans said. “It’s fundamental research.”

The findings will also enable palaeontologists working with incomplete fossilised jaws to literally “fill in the gaps” and make an informed assessment of the size of the missing teeth.

Dr Evans said when looking at three teeth in a row, the middle tooth would be the average size of the teeth sitting either side.

“This gives us a starting point, as we can compare any new fossil with our expectations … and if we do find some exceptions or changes then we can say ‘well, something really interesting must be happening here’,” he said.

But more importantly, the realisation gives a sense of order to a process previously believed to be random.

“When people had looked at human evolution before they thought ‘everything’s changing all over the place and it’s all very confusing’,” Dr Evans said. “But what we have now is a general framework or a default pattern of development to say that pretty much all hominins and probably all mammals develop in this same way.”

The size and proportion of teeth can reveal not only when meat started to be eaten but also when cooking and the use of tools began. Each of these changes affect tooth size, because suddenly teeth could be smaller.

The 11-member research team began looking at mouse tooth development and established the “inhibitory cascade” rule before confirming the pattern in humans.

To do that they studied tooth measurements from every hominin fossil found to establish that the pattern existed there, which it did. The researchers then tested their theory out on great ape and human data to see if the pattern was evident.

“It was very obvious, immediately,” Dr Evans said. “But nobody had noticed it before.”

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Henry Sapiecha

ASSISTANT TAKES DENTIST TO COURT BECAUSE HE FIRED HER ASHE WAS TOO GREAT A TEMPTATION FOR HIM

DENTIST SACKS ASSISTANT BECAUSE SHE WAS TOO INVITING

A dentist who fired his assistant because he found her to be an “irresistible attraction” and a threat to his marriage was within his legal rights to do so, a US court has ruled.

Melissa Nelson, 32, was fired from her job as a dental nurse in Iowa after her employer, James Knight, found her tight clothing and behaviour to be a distraction.’Too sexy for her shirt’

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Six months before Mrs Nelson was fired, she and her boss began exchanging text messages about work and personal matters, including their children’s activities, the justices wrote

No sexual relationship ever occurred between the dentist and his employee of 10 years. However, the all-male Iowa State Supreme Court ruled that Dr Knight, 53, was within his legal rights when he fired Mrs Nelson, affirming the decision of a lower court.

Fired from her job ... Melissa Nelson.Fired from her job … Melissa Nelson. Photo: abcNEWS.com

The sacking did not constitute unlawful discrimination because it was motivated by feelings and emotions and not gender, the Iowa Supreme Court ruled.

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“I think it is completely wrong,” Mrs Nelson, a mother of two, told ABC News in the US.

“I think it is sending a message that men can do whatever they want in the work force.

Dr James Knight had employed Mrs Nelson for 10 years, and he acknowledged in court documents that she was a good worker.Dr James Knight had employed Mrs Nelson for 10 years, and he acknowledged in court documents that she was a good worker. Photo: abcNEWS.com

“I was very surprised after working so many years side-by-side. I didn’t have any idea that that would have crossed his mind.”

Her lawyer, Paige Fiedler, said the “appalling” decision failed to recognise discrimination against women in the workforce

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“These judges sent a message to Iowa women that they don’t think men can be held responsible for their sexual desires and that Iowa women are the ones who have to monitor and control their bosses’ sexual desires,” she told the Huffington Post.

“If they get out of hand, then the women can be legally fired for it.”

Dr Knight had employed Mrs Nelson for 10 years, and he acknowledged in court documents that she was a good worker.

However, in the final months of her employment, Dr Knight began to make comments about her clothing being too tight or distracting.

“Dr Knight acknowledges he once told Nelson that if she saw his pants bulging, she would know her clothing was too revealing,” the Supreme Court justices wrote.
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Six months before Mrs Nelson was fired, she and her boss began exchanging text messages about work and personal matters, including their children’s activities, the justices wrote.

The messages were mostly mundane, but Mrs Nelson recalled one text she received from her boss asking “how often she experienced an orgasm”.

Mrs Nelson did not respond to the text and never indicated that she was uncomfortable with Dr Knight’s question, according to court documents.

He allegedly also once commented on her infrequent sex life by saying: “That’s like having a Lamborghini in the garage and never driving it.”

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Soon after, Dr Knight’s wife, Jeanne, who also worked at the dental practice, found out about the text messages and ordered her husband to fire Mrs Nelson.

The husband and wife consulted a pastor at their church, who was present when Dr Knight fired Mrs Nelson in 2010.

Mrs Nelson’s husband said he later spoke to Dr Knight, who told him that he was worried that he was getting too personally attached and feared he would eventually try to start an affair with her.

Mrs Nelson filed a lawsuit alleging gender discrimination, arguing she would not have been terminated if she was male.

Dr Knight argued Mrs Nelson was fired not because of her gender, but because her continued employment threatened his marriage.

A district judge agreed, dismissing the case before trial, and the high court upheld that ruling.

Dr Knight’s lawyer, Stuart Cochrane, said the dentist believed firing Mrs Nelson would result in the best outcome.

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“While there was really no fault on the part of Mrs Nelson, it was just as clear the decision to terminate her was not related to the fact that she was a woman,” he told the Huffington Post.

“The motives behind Dr Knight terminating Mrs Nelson were quite clear: He did so to preserve his marriage.

“I don’t view this as a decision that was either pro-women or opposed to women rights at all. In my view, this was a decision that followed the appropriate case law.”

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Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha