Archive for the ‘TREATMENTS’ Category

Amazing New Paste From Japan Repairs Cavities Without Drilling

An incredible breakthrough treatment for tooth decay is set to be unveiled shortly: A team of researchers in Japan led by Kazue Yamagishi, D.M.D. have come up with a special paste that regenerates the tooth enamel, causing teeth to self-repair. This is an astonishing discovery.

Did you know that 60% of dental therapy is said to be a retreatment of teeth that have already been treated? This is because dental filling materials such as resin or metal alloy are totally different from a tooth in composition and structure, and those differences cause tooth decay at the point where the two materials make contact.

Remineralization of teeth is a subject plagued by controversy, with “orthodox” dental theory holding that once teeth are decayed, there is simply no going back. But has this ever struck you as strange? If your skin or bones are damaged, they grow back. Why not teeth? Why is this “impossible”? Alternative dental theory, such as that propounded by Dr. Westin A. Price, maintains that the problem with our teeth is actually caused by modern agriculture, which does not provide the body with the level of minerals that are needed to prevent decay or even for teeth to heal. Dr. Price examined the skulls of very ancient tribal people and found that they had excellent and even perfect dental health, despite living in an era before toothpaste, toothbrushes or dental fillings existed!

However, the “official position” on whether tooth enamel can regenerate “naturally” may soon be completely irrelevant, thanks to the work of Kazue Yamagishi – whose synthetic enamel treatment will (according to his website) be available to the public in 2016. He states on his website “We have succeeded in developing such therapy of dreams”.Curiously, the method makes perfect sense: Regrow the tooth using the exact crystalline minerals a tooth is made from, rather than attempting to patch it with another substance.

Enamel is the outer layer of the human tooth. It is approximately 1 to 1.5mm thick and composed of hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals. Acid-forming bacteria in the mouth typically damage this enamel gradually over time and this effect is of course accelerated by poor dental hygiene, which allows the bacteria to grow in greater numbers. The new paste of Dr. Yamagishi “grows HAP crystals, which are exactly like those in natural enamel, at the affected site within 15 min”. The team reported their exact methods (including listing the exact substances used) in a scientific paper [3] and reported that the new enamel, when examined under a high power microscope, grew continuous crystals, with no discontinuous boundary being observed.

The treatment is currently in the clinical trial stage in Japan, but no trials are scheduled in EU or USA yet. Another great reason to visit Japan… but let’s show our support for introducing these possibilities to the rest of the world.

Note that this paste will require a dentist’s application and is reported unsuitable for home use due to the care which must be taken for the chemicals not to touch the gums at all. Also it is reported to work best on “microcaries” – the first stage of dental decay. However it really does seem that this treatment could prevent decay from ever getting hold and even bring us to the point where with proper treatment, tooth decay really becomes a thing of the past!

Another interesting positive effect of the proposed new treatment is that the treated tooth will become whiter than a normal tooth owing to the purity of the apatite minerals used – so it will be a whitening treatment into the bargain. [4]

References:

[1] How To Heal Cavities – The Astonishing Claims Of The Oil Pullers

[2] Kazue Yamagishi’s Webpage for the synthetic enamel treatment

[3] Kazue Yamagishi et.al. “A Synthetic Enamel for Rapid Tooth Repair” – Nature, 2005. http://homepage2.nifty.com/nmc/FHAP.pdf

[4] Kazue Yamagishi’s FAQ on the new paste

Henry Sapiecha

Blizzident “toothbrush” is claimed to clean your teeth in 6 seconds see video here

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With the new Blizzident toothbrush (if it can be called a toothbrush), a full and complete cleaning of the teeth can reportedly be accomplished in just six seconds.

When it comes to things that people don’t do as often or as well as they should, tooth-brushing would have to be at the top of the list. While it usually just comes down to laziness, a lot of people claim that they don’t brush their teeth properly because they don’t have time. Well, with the new Blizzident toothbrush (if it can be called a toothbrush), a full and complete cleaning of the teeth can reportedly be accomplished in just six seconds.

blizzident-teeth-image www.perfectwhiteteeth (3)

Before they can receive a Blizzident, users first have to go to their dentist and get an impression made of their teeth. Next, a 3D digital model of that impression is uploaded to the Blizzident company’s server. The company proceeds to create a 3D-printed plastic negative mold of the teeth, which is lined with approximately 400 toothbrush-style angled bristles. That mold is the actual Blizzident toothbrush, and is sent to the buyer.

To brush their teeth, users just put the Blizzident into their mouth, bite up and down into it, and grind their teeth back and forth. Because it’s an exact fit for their teeth, six seconds of chomping and grinding is reportedly long enough for the bristles to get into all the nooks and crannies, including between teeth and along the gum line.

If they wish to, users can also thread dental floss between the individual tooth impressions on the Blizzident, causing that floss to be pushed up between the teeth when they bite down. A role of floss can be held in a dispenser on the front of the brush.

blizzident-teeth-image www.perfectwhiteteeth (1)

Finally, a tongue scraper/brush bridges the top of the toothbrush. Users just run their tongue back and forth against it.

blizzident-teeth-image www.perfectwhiteteeth.net

One Blizzident is said to be good for a year of use, after which users can get a completely new one, or send their old one in for cleaning and re-bristling. A buyer’s first brush will cost them US$299, with subsequent replacement units priced at $159, and refurbishments of existing units costing $89. The company also notes that getting the initial impression made by a local dentist should cost between $75 and $200, depending on the technique used.

Animation depicting how the brush is claimed to work can be seen in the video below.

Source: Blizzident via Quartz

beauty

Henry Sapiecha

Toothpaste ingredient repairs teeth while you are sleeping

biominf-toothpaste-image www.perfectwhiteteeth (2)

The new toothpaste aims to tackle dental decay through a slow release of calcium, phosphate and fluoride ions. View gallery (2 images)

A new toothpaste technology, known as BioMin, is designed to replace minerals lost from tooth enamel, working while the user sleeps to prevent decay. Available to dentists as a toothpaste called BioMinF, and set to be marketed to consumers in the near future, the product is long-acting, and also tackles sensitivity.

Dental decay and sensitivity is extremely prevalent, with some 42 percent of children between the ages of 2 and 11 affected by it, and a whopping 92 percent of adults between 20 and 64 having to deal with it at some point.

A new toothpaste called BioMinF, based on research from the Queen Mary University of London and Imperial College London, aims to tackle dental decay through a slow release of calcium, phosphate and fluoride ions. Whereas normal toothpastes wear off after only a couple of hours, BioMin pastes work for 8-12 hours after brushing, with the flouride – which is resistant to the acid found in things like soft drinks – forming a protective layer over the enamel.

The calcium and phosphate do even more, working with the saliva in the mouth and combining to form a new mineral that’s able to strengthen and rebuilt the tooth structure. Sensitivity is tackled by forming a barrier over open tubules, which provide access to open nerves. The BioMin tech seals off the nerves, lowering sensitivity, particularly to hot and cold food and drink.

biominf-toothpaste-image www.perfectwhiteteeth (1)

Interestingly, the new sensitivity and decay-tackling toothpaste tech could, according to the team behind it, also appear in other dental hygiene products.

“The technology behind BioMin is not however exclusively designed for toothpastes,” said the company’s chief scientific officer Professor Robert Hill. “It can also be incorporated in other professionally applied dental products such as cleaning and polishing pastes, varnishes and remineralizing filling materials.”

BioMin Technologies – the company behind the breakthrough ingredient – is aiming to commercialise the development of the product, with a fluoride-free version also in the works. The BioMinF toothpaste is available to dentists via wholesalers right now, priced at £5 (US$7) for a 75 ml tube. For everyone else, you can expect the new paste to be on store shelves by the end of the year.

Source: BioMin

TTTT

Henry Sapiecha

Low-power laser triggers stem cells to repair teeth

low-power-laser-stem-cell-tooth-repair image www.perfectwhiteteeth (1)

New research indicates that it may one day be possible for us to regrow teeth … with some help from a laser

Ranking among the X-Men probably isn’t all that it’s cracked up to be, but who wouldn’t want their uncanny ability to regenerate lost bone or tissue? New research into tooth repair and stem cell biology, from a cross-institution team led by David Mooney of Harvard’s Wyss Institute, may bring such regeneration one step closer to reality – or at the very least, give us hope that we can throw away those nasty dentures.

The researchers employed a low-power laser to trigger human dental stem cells to form dentin, a hard bone-like tissue that is one of four major components of teeth (the others being enamel, pulp, and cementum). This kind of low-level light therapy has previously been used to remove or stimulate hair growth and to rejuvenate skin cells, but the mechanisms were not well understood, results varied, and evidence of its efficacy was largely anecdotal.

low-power-laser-stem-cell-tooth-repair image www.perfectwhiteteeth (2)

The new work is the first to document the molecular mechanism involved, thus laying the foundations for controlled treatment protocols in not only restorative dentistry but also avenues like bone regeneration and wound healing. “The scientific community is actively exploring a host of approaches to using stem cells for tissue regeneration efforts,” said Wyss Institute Founding Director Don Ingber. “Dave [Mooney] and his team have added an innovative, noninvasive, and remarkably simple but powerful tool to the toolbox.”

To test the team’s hypothesis, Praveen Arany, an assistant clinical investigator at the National Institutes of Health, drilled holes in the molars of rats and mice, then treated them with low-dose lasers and temporary caps. Around 12 weeks later, tests confirmed that the laser treatments triggered enhanced dentin formation.

Performing dentistry on rat teeth takes extreme precision and is actually harder than the same procedure on human teeth (Image: ames Weaver, Harvard’s Wyss Institute)

low-power-laser-stem-cell-tooth-repair image www.perfectwhiteteeth (3)

Further experiments were conducted on microbial cultures in the laboratory, where they found that a regulatory cell protein called transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) was activated in a chemical domino effect that in turn caused the stem cells to form dentin. The good news there is that TGF-β1 is more or less ubiquitous, with key roles in many biological processes – such as immune response, wound healing, development, and malignancies.

This means we could one day see the technique used to do far more than help repair teeth. But first it needs to clear planned human clinical trials, so for now you’ll have to make do with dentures, canes and all manner of other prosthetics while the likes of Wolverine prance around with self-healing bodies.

low-power-laser-stem-cell-tooth-repair image www.perfectwhiteteeth (4)

A paper on the research was recently published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Source: Wyss Institute at Harvard

Henry Sapiecha

PERFECT WHITE TEETH USING TWO FOODS FROM YOUR KITCHEN SHOWN IN THIS VIDEO

HOW TO WHITEN YOUR TEETH IN A FEW MINUTES USING KITCHEN INGREDIENTS

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Henry Sapiecha

DIY HOME PRODUCT USE FOR PERFECT WHITE TEETH AS SEEN IN THIS VIDEO

PERFECT WHITE TEETH USING THE PRODUCTS SHOWN IN THIS VIDEO

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hENRY sAPIECHA

RED WINE GREAT FOR YOUR PEARLY WHITES.DRINK & ENJOY.


Tooth Whitening Superstore.Com

Red wine battles cavities

Any reason to drink is a good one as far as I’m concerned, so here’s one more for the list: Red wine is good for your teeth.

No, I’m not drunk and I haven’t gone crazy – I know wine can darken your pearly whites if you’re not careful.

But the polyphenols in a good red can also stop the process that leads to cavities and tooth decay.

As you learned in kindergarten, sugar kicks this party off. But the sugar alone doesn’t do all the damage – it gets help from Streptococcus mutans, bacteria that basically eat the sugar and poop out glucans.

The glucans form a film on your teeth that then allow the bacteria to cling and cause decay and rot – and next thing you know, you’re screaming 7 kicking in a dentist’s chair.

Tooth Whitening Superstore.Com

But researchers have found that the polyphenols in fermented grape stems, skins, and seeds actually render S. mutans impotent, at least when it comes to all that glucan- making.

The researchers also found a similar effect with cranberries. And if you can eat or cook with plain cranberries, more power to you. But since most people have never seen a cranberry that wasn’t drowned in sugar and then sauced or juiced, let’s stick to the wine.

Researchers say the two best wines for bacteria-blocking polyphenols are Cabernet Franc and Pinot Noir. But they don’t recommend actually drinking those wines – oh no. That would be too easy.

These killjoys point out that wine can stain teeth, so instead they want to isolate the polyphenols and add them to toothpaste and mouthwash.

And that’s where this turns into hogwash – because you just know that rinse will be loaded with fluoride, too.

Since the benefits of wine go far beyond cavity prevention, don’t be afraid to drink up. And if you’re worried about stains, be sure to rinse with 3 percent hydrogen peroxide at the end of your evening.

Just remember to swallow your wine and spit your peroxide, and you’ll do just fine.

Wining and dining,

William Campbell Douglass II, M.D
Tooth Whitening Superstore.Com

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

ARE WE PARANOID ABOUT A WHITER SMILE?

TOO MUCH TV HE SAYS…

I am not anti white teeth but come on people. You watch too much tv and look at too many air brushed magazine photos. If you really want white teeth in a photo then use photoshop. It doesnt taste bad and it wont harm your teeth. I said photoshop not photopowder.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

WHITER TEETH WANTED BY EVERYONE

White teeth is everyone’s issue.


It seems that they are not contented with their white teeth. The color of teeth of celebrities and film stars are the envy of everybody.

There are foods and substances that are known for staining teeth so you can consciously avoid these substances. Some foods that can cause stains are tea, coffee, and red wine. This is not an exhaustive list, but it is a start. Behaviors such as smoking are know to cause tooth stains too. You may not want to avoid these foods, and you may want to remove the stains that have already been caused. In this case, you are going to have to look elsewhere. Professional whitening is expensive, but it yields results. You make an appointment to have your dentist whiten your teeth, and the whitening is accomplished that way. The problem with this method is that it tends to be rather expensive. Not everyone wants to shell out large amount of money for teeth whitening services, especially when they know there is another way, and that other way can be highly effective on its own.

White teeth is the side effect of many of the high concentration gels which mixes with saliva and forms peroxide. This will burn the gums and other tissues within the mouth. Some more natural methods to whiten the teeth include additives to toothpaste. Many companies include silica, calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate in their products. These materials simply remove stains by grinding off foreign deposits. In this way, these materials do not actually alter the color of the teeth.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

WHITE TEETH, COFFEE & RED WINE

I am a coffee drinker, and on occasions i like to drink red wine.


“rub fresh sage leaves on your teeth to clean them and remove stains.

White teeth is not as important as having healthy teeth and gums. Many dentists and periodontists have a “plaque control” patient education room for demos and videos to learn the proper brushing techniques (note i say techniques. ) so if given a chance to view such a patient education aid, sit through it with kids if you have them. Also, please be aware that while my ideas on oral hygiene will go far in maintaining your overall oral health, you must not only get regular dental checkups, but you also must have your teeth as well-maintained as you do for your fave car. Again, i underscore the mandatory need for flossing and rinsing before brushing. Plaque must be removed at least once every 24 hours, and since mornings are already a rush for most, if you do the method i have described at night, not only will you have more time to properly devote to your teeth, but your mouth will be clean for the longest time before you breakfast, etc. And do not brush your teeth in the mornings and then eat breakfast. Here’s the info on the proper brushes to obtain. Butler toothbrushes, i have no affiliation with the company or the web site, in other words, i have nothing to gain, nor am i in any way endorsing the products listed here other than to say that there are no better brushes to be had—anywhere. You simply cannot find good toothbrushes in drug or grocery stores, and the prices of the ones i recommended are equivalent or even less expensive than other off-the-shelf products.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha